ADHD

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, every person I know, including myself,  has ADHD

According to the CDC

5 million children ages 3-17 are diagnosed with ADHD

11% of boys are diagnosed with ADHD while only 4.8% of girls

And these numbers don’t include the number of adults that are being diagnosed with the “disease”

Shucks folks, any woman entering the menopausal years would fit the criteria…

most people I know can’t find their keys, on a good day…

bored unless it’s something I enjoy… it’s called being human folks…

Oh but wait… ADULT diagnosis of ADHD is on the rise.  According to this article from “American Family Physician” 40-50% of children diagnosed with ADHD will have the disease in adulthood (be forewarned there is a drug advertisement to “skip” before you get to read the actual article)

So, What are the symptoms of ADHD in children?

According to the NIMH (linked above):

Inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity are the key behaviors of ADHD.   It is normal for all children to be inattentive, hyperactive, or impulsive sometimes, but for children with ADHD, these behaviors are more severe and occur more often.  To be diagnosed with the disorder, a child must have symptoms for 6 or more months and to a degree that is greater than other children of the same age.  

Children who have symptoms of inattention may:

  • Be easily distracted, miss details, forget things, and frequently switch from one activity to another
  • Have difficulty focusing on one thing
  • Become bored with a task after only a few minutes, unless they are doing something enjoyable
  • Have difficulty focusing attention on organizing and completing a task or learning something new
  • Have trouble completing or turning in homework assignments, often losing things (e.g., pencils, toys, assignments) needed to complete tasks or activities
  • Not seem to listen when spoken to
  • Daydream, become easily confused, and move slowly
  • Have difficulty processing information as quickly and accurately as others
  • Struggle to follow instructions.

Children who have symptoms of hyperactivity may:

  • Fidget and squirm in their seats
  • Talk nonstop
  • Dash around, touching or playing with anything and everything in sight
  • Have trouble sitting still during dinner, school, and story time
  • Be constantly in motion
  • Have difficulty doing quiet tasks or activities.

Children who have symptoms of impulsivity may:

  • Be very impatient
  • Blurt out inappropriate comments, show their emotions without restraint, and act without regard for consequences
  • Have difficulty waiting for things they want or waiting their turns in games
  • Often interrupt conversations or others’ activities.

Don’t these people every read Denise the Menace, or Family Circle, Calvin and Hobbes or For Better or Worse????? 

Why are these comic strips so funny?  You got it… it’s every day life!  It’s called being a boy… but oh, I forgot… boys are not allowed to be boys anymore…

So what’s the bottom line?????? 

Money! Money, money, money, money! 

Which is WHY you had to click the “skip” button on the ad before reading the article from the “American Family Physician”

Which is why T.V. is filled with commericials for every kind of medicine in the world…

Which is why every magazine is filled with advertisements on every kind of medicine in the world…

Money…money, money, money, money…

Thankfully, at least one entity is willing to call the whistle on some of this nonsense.  Well sort of…

According to this article in Science Daily  up to 1 million children could be potentially misdiagnosed with ADHD…

Really?  Ya think?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s